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Police officers could get personal fines for failing victims of crime under new proposals


Police officers could get personal fines for failing victims of crime under new proposals to help those who feel let down by justice system

  • Individual police officers could be held responsible for grave errors in work
  • Proposals were floated today – and could see fines handed to individual officers
  • Dominic Raab has asked whether regulators should get powers to impose ‘consequences’










Individual police officers could be held directly responsible for shoddy work – and even personally fined – under proposals floated by ministers today.

Justice Secretary Dominic Raab has asked whether regulators in the criminal justice system should get powers to impose ‘consequences’ on individuals.

The measures could also apply to prosecutors, probation officers and other public sector workers whose mistakes let down victims of crime, a consultation paper indicates. 

The document, published today, asks whether new disciplinary powers could be handed to outside bodies.

Individual police officers could be held directly responsible for shoddy work ¿ and even personally fined ¿ under proposals floated by ministers today (stock image)

Individual police officers could be held directly responsible for shoddy work – and even personally fined – under proposals floated by ministers today (stock image)

It says they could be based on powers held by regulators in the care and financial services sectors, which allow individual workers to be suspended or personally fined if they make grave errors.

The paper, which sets out ways to improve victims’ rights ahead of a new Victims Bill, also says prosecutors could be ordered to meet with victims of the most serious crimes such as rape and families bereaved by homicides before deciding criminal charges. 

It will give victims and their families the chance to describe the impact crimes have had on their lives before legal proceedings are launched, the Government said.

The document also proposes allowing communities to give ‘community impact statements’ before criminals are sentenced for low-level crimes like anti-social behaviour, it says. 

In a further measure, the victim surcharge – which is imposed on all criminals – could rise from as low as £20 to a minimum of £100.

Justice Secretary Dominic Raab (pictured) has asked whether regulators in the criminal justice system should get powers to impose ¿consequences¿ on individuals

Justice Secretary Dominic Raab (pictured) has asked whether regulators in the criminal justice system should get powers to impose ‘consequences’ on individuals

Pilot schemes which have allowed rape victims to pre-record evidence for a trial will also be rolled out across England and Wales, it was confirmed. 

Mr Raab said: ‘Our plans will give victims a louder voice, a greater role in the criminal justice system, and make criminals pay more to help victims recover.’

The Victims’ Commissioner Dame Vera Baird said: ‘The Government’s Victims’ Bill represents a once in a generation opportunity to drive real culture change, requiring agencies to see, hear and help victims – if necessary, with real consequences if this does not happen.’ 

Diana Fawcett, chief executive of the charity Victim Support, said: ‘Our research has found time and time again that victims do not always receive their rights and entitlements, and so the Government’s focus on strengthening victims’ rights is welcome.’

There will be an eight-week consultation on the proposals before a Victims Bill is published next year.

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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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