in

Annastacia Palaszczuk, Queensland border re-opening: Major Christmas blunder in day five testing


Queensland’s requirement that travellers arriving from interstate hotspots take a Covid test after five days in the state faces claims it will be impossible to achieve over the holiday period.

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath and Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk have come under fire for the requirement, with several commentators arguing it won’t be practical for visitors to get a test at Christmas.

Ms D’Ath tried to hose down the growing controversy on Tuesday saying she would tweak the health directions.    

‘Where you cannot get a test on that particular day because the testing is not available, we will make the sure the direction allows for that person to get that test shortly before or shortly after to still meet that requirement,’ Ms D’Ath said.

‘If they’re stuck on an island with no testing capacity available, the aim would be,  the moment they leave the island, or about to go to island and on day three, get the test before they go.’  

Under the public health directive, fines will apply to those who fail to take the second PCR test but Ms D’Ath downplayed the punitive aspects of the new policy.

‘This isn’t about using a stick and going in and fining people, this is about people doing the right thing,’ she said. 

Any travellers who test positive will be asked to comply with directions from the public health unit to isolate or be moved into clinical care, depending on their location and level of sickness, she said.

Two key requirements for those coming to Queensland from declared hotspots from Monday, Dec 13 will be the need to produce a negative Covid-19 test result within 72 hours of arrival and a second test will then be required within five days after arriving in the state

Two key requirements for those coming to Queensland from declared hotspots from Monday, Dec 13 will be the need to produce a negative Covid-19 test result within 72 hours of arrival and a second test will then be required within five days after arriving in the state

Under the public health directive, fines will apply to travellers to Queensland who fail to take the second PCR test

Under the public health directive, fines will apply to travellers to Queensland who fail to take the second PCR test

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk took a dig at the 'Fortress Queensland' image on the Today Show this morning when she said the state had been 'open to most of the states and territories except for NSW, Victoria and the ACT'

Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk took a dig at the ‘Fortress Queensland’ image on the Today Show this morning when she said the state had been ‘open to most of the states and territories except for NSW, Victoria and the ACT’

The change to the testing policy comes after Queensland Premier Annastacia Palaszczuk took a dig at the ‘Fortress Queensland’ image on the Today Show this morning.  

Host Sylvia Jeffreys asked Ms Palaszczuk if she could now guarantee the state would stay open ‘for good’.  

‘Well, we hope so and we’ve been open to most of the states and territories except for NSW, Victoria and the ACT,’ Ms Palaszczuk replied.

‘I think the rest of Australia forgets that when you’re living in Sydney and Melbourne.’

Ms Palaszczuk announced yesterday that visitors from NSW, Victoria and the ACT could resume travelling to the state from 1am on December 13, four days earlier than planned.

The earlier date was made possible by Queensland reaching the milestone of 80 per cent of it eligible population being fully vaccinated this week.

Two key requirements for those coming to Queensland from declared hotspots will be the need to produce a negative Covid-19 test result within 72 hours of arrival.  

A second test will then be required within five days after arriving in the state.

The test applies to those aged 16 and above, with children under that age required to be tested only if they’re symptomatic. 

But many have questioned how people will be able to access the test on public holidays after the Christmas-New Year period.

Travellers arriving into the state on December 20, for example, will need to be tested again on Christmas Day December 25.

In a statement to Daily Mail Australia, Queensland Health said testing facilities will be available despite public holiday closures.

‘Over the Christmas period, many Hospital and Health Services have plans in place to ensure existing Fever Clinics are open and available to the public, should anyone need to be tested,’ it said.

‘Our health services will remain ready and able to flex up and down with demand.

‘There are also testing clinics available in the private sector.’

Testing clinic locations are available on the Queensland Health website.

Ms D’Ath said the government was ‘checking’ with private health clinics as to their testing capacity over the holiday period. 

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D'Ath announced new fines for those who deliberately spit, cough or sneeze on workers at venues with requirements for all patrons and staff to be fully vaccinated from December 17

Queensland Health Minister Yvette D’Ath announced new fines for those who deliberately spit, cough or sneeze on workers at venues with requirements for all patrons and staff to be fully vaccinated from December 17

Visitors from NSW, Victoria and the ACT can resume travelling to Queensland from 1am on December 13, four days earlier than originally planned

Visitors from NSW, Victoria and the ACT can resume travelling to Queensland from 1am on December 13, four days earlier than originally planned

Ms D’Ath also announced new fines for those who deliberately spit, cough or sneeze on workers at venues with requirements for all patrons and staff to be fully vaccinated from December 17. 

A $1378 on-the-spot fine will be issued for the offence, or a fine up to $13,785 and six months’ jail if police decide to prosecute through the courts.

‘In April last year we extended the offence of spitting, coughing or sneezing deliberately on people, or threatening to do so, to retail workers because we know they saw appalling behaviour when they were just trying to do their job, serving the community,’ Ms D’Ath said.

The move follows concerns expressed by businesses that their frontline staff will bear the brunt of ensuring compliance with the mandatory vaccination directive.

All unvaccinated people in the state will be banned from venues such as restaurants, bars, pubs, clubs, theatres, cinemas and sporting venues from December 17.

Government-run facilities such as museums and galleries will also require visitors to be vaccinated.

Public transport, GPs surgeries and supermarkets will not require visitors to be vaccinated.

Queensland recorded one new case of community Covid transmission on Tuesday, a man on the Gold Coast who health authorities believe may be the source of the cluster of four cases in the city. 

The man has been infectious in the community for a number of days and it’s believed he had travelled from NSW. 

Queensland now has 7.3 per cent of people with a first dose and 78.6 per cent who are fully vaccinated. 

It is expected to pass 80 per cent of the eligible population double-dosed some time this week.



Source link

Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Zucker fires back at Cuomo: CNN chief tells staff that network will investigate sex misconduct claim

Prison guards could be scanned on entry in bid to crackdown on scourge of drugs in jail