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Doctors and hospital workers hit out at Sajid Javid over assisted dying law


Medics hit out over assisted dying law: Doctors and hospital workers write letter to Sajid Javid opposing the ‘shift from preserving life to taking life’

  • The open letter was signed by 1,689 doctors, nurses, pharmacists and students
  • The Assisted Dying Bill allows terminally ill adults to seek assistance to die
  • The controversial bill has its second reading in parliament tomorrow










Medical professionals have told Sajid Javid they will not cooperate with any new law on assisted dying.

They spelt out their opposition in an open letter to the Health Secretary signed by 1,689 doctors, nurses, pharmacists and medical students.

They insisted that ‘the shift from preserving life to taking life was enormous and should not be minimised’.

Medical professionals have told Sajid Javid they will not cooperate with any new law on assisted dying

Medical professionals have told Sajid Javid they will not cooperate with any new law on assisted dying

The Assisted Dying Bill, which would allow terminally ill adults to legally seek assistance to end their lives, has its second reading in parliament tomorrow.

Campaigners say it will give people with terminal illnesses greater choice and control over how and when they die, with safeguards to protect them and their loved ones. 

Opponents say it will put pressure on people to end their lives.

The letter reads: ‘The prohibition of killing is the safeguard. The current law is the protection for the vulnerable. 

They spelt out their opposition in an open letter to the Health Secretary signed by 1,689 doctors, nurses, pharmacists and medical students

They spelt out their opposition in an open letter to the Health Secretary signed by 1,689 doctors, nurses, pharmacists and medical students

‘Any change would threaten society’s ability to safeguard vulnerable patients from abuse.

‘It would undermine the trust the public places in physicians, and it would send a clear message to our frail, elderly and disabled patients about the value that society places on them.’

Faith leaders have also expressed ‘profound disquiet’. Archbishop of Canterbury Justin Welby, Roman Catholic Cardinal Vincent Nichols and Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis have written to Mr Javid warning him the safeguards are inadequate.

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Written by Bourbiza Mohamed

A technology enthusiast and a passionate writer in the field of information technology, cyber security, and blockchain

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