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Democrat AND Republican voters want the federal government to crack down on big tech giants

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Democrats and Republican voters alike are pushing the federal government to crack down on big technology companies by issuing stronger regulations.

A new poll revealed that 80 percent of registered voters believe the influence of big tech companies that have ‘grown too powerful’ and use ‘our data to reach too far into our lives’. 

Voters want policy makers to strengthen user privacy and hold big tech giants accountable.

They have also indicated they are ‘very nervous’ about the effects that social media has on their children.  

The poll findings come as the role of tech giants continues to be re-evaluated worldwide, according The Washington Post.

Democrat and Republican voters alike are pushing the federal government to crack down on big technology companies by issuing stronger regulations

Benenson Strategy Group, in partnership with Public Opinion Strategies, surveyed 2,016 registered voters in late July on behalf the Future of Tech Commission.

Results showed that 83 percent of Democrats and 78 percent of Republicans think federal policy makers need to take steps to limit the influence of big tech companies.

‘[The poll shows that] the tech industry has got to operate within boundaries—and the only entity that can bind it is the federal government,’ former Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, also one of the commissions three co-chairs, told the newspaper.

The poll argues that strengthening user privacy and holding big tech giants accountable are the two biggest priorities for Americans, in regard to tech policy. 

However, while there is large support for strengthening anti-trust laws, voters agreed by 54 percent to 45 percent that ‘breaking up big tech companies threatens our country’s biggest drivers of innovation and growth.’

The poll also found that 84 percent of Democrats and 85 percent of Republicans expressed concerns about how social media was impacting their children.

The poll argues that strengthening user privacy and holding big tech giants accountable are the two biggest priorities for Americans, in regard to tech policy

The poll also indicated that most voters typically viewed big tech firms in favorable light, however their executives, including Mark Zuckerberg  (pictured), were not well favored

The poll also indicated that most voters typically viewed big tech firms in favorable light, however their executives, including Mark Zuckerberg  (pictured), were not well favored

Additionally, the commission has been holding tech policy town halls nationwide. 

‘What we hear consistently is that people want and expect federal leadership,’ said commission co-chair Margaret Spellings, who used to serve as education secretary under former President George W. Bush.

‘Secondly, they want America, the U.S., to be the world’s leader in these issues.’ 

The poll also indicated that most voters view big tech firms with the following favorability ratings: Google at 81 percent, Amazon at 74 percent, Apple at 67 percent and Facebook at 53 percent.

Big tech executives, including Mark Zuckerberg and Jeff Bezos, were not as well favored. 

The poll’s findings, which are said to have a margin of error of 2.07 percent, come as organizations have begun to evaluate the roles of tech companies worldwide. 

The poll revealed the following favorability ratings: Google at 81 percent, Amazon at 74 percent (founder Jeff Bezos pictured), Apple at 67 percent and Facebook at 53 percent.

The poll revealed the following favorability ratings: Google at 81 percent, Amazon at 74 percent (founder Jeff Bezos pictured), Apple at 67 percent and Facebook at 53 percent.

Several big tech companies including Facebook, Amazon, Apple (CEO Tim Cook pictured) and Google have 'generally rejected' arguments that they 'exercise too much power,' citing the fact that they operate in 'dynamic and highly competitive markets'

Several big tech companies including Facebook, Amazon, Apple (CEO Tim Cook pictured) and Google have ‘generally rejected’ arguments that they ‘exercise too much power,’ citing the fact that they operate in ‘dynamic and highly competitive markets’

Several big tech companies including Facebook, Amazon, Apple and Google have ‘generally rejected’ arguments that they ‘exercise too much power,’ citing the fact that they operate in ‘dynamic and highly competitive markets’.

However, at the same time, some of the companies have expressed openness to changes regarding privacy protections.  

‘As we have said for some time now, we support updated rules of the road for the internet and privacy regulations that will set more consistent data-protection standards that work for everyone,’ said Steve Satterfield, Facebook’s vice president for privacy and public policy.

Facebook also noted that the company had been ‘advocating for updated internet regulations for some time. We’ll continue working with Congress and the administration to set clear and fair rules that support a safe and secure open internet.’

Google, Apple and Amazon did not respond to the newspaper’s response for comment. DailyMail.com has also reached out. 

During his presidency, Donald Trump (pictured( tried to get lawmakers to change section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects so-called 'big tech,' like Facebook and Twitter, from being held liable for what's posted on their sites

During his presidency, Donald Trump (pictured( tried to get lawmakers to change section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects so-called ‘big tech,’ like Facebook and Twitter, from being held liable for what’s posted on their sites

Meanwhile, during his presidency, Donald Trump tried to get lawmakers to change section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which protects so-called ‘big tech,’ like Facebook and Twitter, from being held liable for what’s posted on their sites.

Trump said that keeping section 230 intact was a win for foreign bad actors.

‘The Act fails even to make any meaningful changes to Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, despite bipartisan calls for repealing that provision,’ he said in December 2020.

‘Section 230 facilitates the spread of foreign disinformation online, which is a serious threat to our national security and election integrity. It must be repealed.’

Trump also filed three class-action suits against big tech giants YouTube, Facebook and Twitter this past summer. He sought damages that could amount to ‘trillions’ for an alleged violation of his First Amendment rights. 

The lawsuit alleges First Amendment violations by YouTube because it claims the video platform banned the former president at the behest of Democratic members of Congress.

He filed the suits in collaboration with the America First Policy Institute, founded by former members of his administration.

All three suits, filed in Miami and Ft. Lauderdale, Fla., also ask federal judges to declare Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act unconstitutional.



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